Europe


Everyone knows that soccer is a foreign invasion, but few people know exactly what is wrong with that. More than having to do with its origin, soccer is a European sport because it is all about death and despair. Americans would never invent a sport where the better you get the less you score. Even the way most games end, in sudden death, suggests something of an old-fashioned duel. How could anyone enjoy a game where so much energy results in so little advantage, and which typically ends with a penalty kick out, as if it is the audience that needs to be put out of its misery?

Stephen H. Webb, Soccer Is Ruining America, Wall Street Journal

[H]istory contains no record of a British political party losing an election because it was perceived as insufficiently pro-French.

Walter Russell Mead

Berlin-WallTwenty years ago today, I sat in front of the TV with my dad, watching the Berlin Wall fall.  It was one of the defining moments of my youth.  He had served in the U.S. Army in West Germany in the early ’70s and had walked along the wall, seeing first hand the division it represented.  That night, we sat watching the events unfold, and both of us had tears rolling down our cheeks.  Seeing my father’s reaction more than anything else impressed on me the enormity of the changes unfolding in Eastern Europe.  I hope we never forget that we defeated a real enemy in that war, not just a philosophical paper tiger.

It took the courage and insight of an entire generation to defeat that evil.  While the war may not have been as obvious, these heroic men and women defeated an evil just as nefarious as the Naziism defeated a generation earlier.

It is a tribute to Reagan’s moral and strategic determination, as it was to everyone else who played their part in bringing down the Wall, that they could see through the sophistries of Soviet propagandists, their Western fellow travelers, and the legions of moral equivocators and diplomatic finessers and simply look at the Wall.

Why the Berlin Wall Fell, WSJ.com (Nov. 9, 2009)

My children likely will not understand.  It will be just so much ancient history—like Vietnam, WWII, the British Empire, Rome and the Pharaohs.  Already the memory is fading.  But, in case anyone needs reminding, communism is not merely an alternative political lifestyle, it is evil.

Considering the enormity of what it commemorates, the Memorial to the Victims of Communism, dedicated by President Bush yesterday, is striking for its modest proportions: a 10-foot female figure raising a torch at a busy intersection in Washington, D.C. That’s a fitting rebuke to an ideology that made a fetish of statuary, and murder, on a monumental scale.

The numbers are almost beyond reckoning. Mao Zedong was responsible for 70 million peacetime murders, according to his biographer Jung Chang. The middle estimate of Stalin’s victims is 40 millionPol Pot slaughtered nearly three million fellow Cambodians in only four years. Ethiopia’s Mengistu killed some 1.5 million opponents in the late 1970s, and contributed to the death by starvation of a million others in the 1980s.

Throughout these and other horrors, Communists always managed to find high-profile apologists among the bourgeois intellectuals: Jean-Paul Sartre for Stalin, Noam Chomsky for Pol Pot, and so on. Some, like Sidney Hook, Arthur Koestler and Whittaker Chambers, repented, but most did not. They may not have been witting accomplices to the butchery, quite. But they are the reason why the West was almost fatally late in recognizing the depth of evil it faced in its communist enemy.

Not by coincidence, yesterday’s dedication took place on the 20th anniversary of Ronald Reagan’s speech at Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate, calling on the Soviets to “tear down this wall.” Back then, the smart set (and some of his own advisers) said he was a fool for seeking to bring the communist nightmare to an end. Inasmuch as he led the free world in doing so, the memorial is also, inescapably, a tribute to him.

— On the dedication of the Memorial to the Victims of Communism, Wall Street journal – June 13, 2007.

What about treason? What about treason? Even — even the — the countries of Europe which have joined the European Convention on Human Rights, I believe they make an exception to the prohibition of the death penalty for treason. You can slaughter your fellow citizens, but if you offend the State you can be put to death.

Justice Anthony Kennedy during oral argument in Kennedy v. Louisiana (2008).

attackpoodleSo much fodder in one little story, I don’t even know where to start . . .

Former French president Jacques Chirac was rushed to hospital after being mauled by his own ‘clinically depressed’ pet dog.

The 76-year-old statesman was savaged by his white Maltese dog – which suffers from frenzied fits and is being treated with anti-depressants.

The animal, named Sumo, had become increasingly violent over the past years and was prone to making ‘vicious, unprovoked attacks’, Chirac’s wife Bernadette said.

Upon questioning, the dog admitted that he had, in fact, attached Chirac.  Sumo did, however, note that the former president put up no resistance whatsoever.  “I guess that after years of conditioning French politicians can’t help but surrender.  It’s like that miscreant Pavlov messing with those poor beagles,” said Sumo

When asked about his depression, Sumo seemed both defeated and defensive, replying, “It is so hard to maintain any self respect.  You would be clinically depressed too if you woke up one morning realizing that you were the descendent of wolves but had been reduced to a quiche eating surrender monkey’s lap dog.”

Primary farm producers in the world’s developed countries receive about $280 billion a year in government support. In the European Union, farmers receive a third of their income from government subsidies. Beef and veal producers get more than 70% of their income from subsidies.

A typical cow in the European Union receives a government subsidy of $2.20 a day. The cow earns more than 1.2 billion of the world’s poorest people.

Mark Vaile, Australian trade minister in 2005

(HT Carpe Diem)

Next Page »