Super Bowl 50 was played on February 7, 2016 at Levi Stadium between the Carolina Panthers and the Denver Broncos. Here are a few stats from that game:

 

    Carolina generated 315 yards of offense compared to just 194 for Denver.

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    Carolina possessed the ball for 32:47 minutes versus 27:13 for Denver.

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    Carolina gained more first downs, ran more plays, had more drives and made more yards per play.

    But, at the end of the game, the score was Denver 24 : Carolina 10.

 

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    Carolina fans were upset, disappointed, maybe even chagrined, but none of them argued that Denver wasn’t really the winner or questioned Denver’s legitimacy as the Super Bowl Champion.

 

    Why? Because everyone knew the rules of the game going in. Yards of offense, time of possession and everything else do not matter. What matters is who scores the most points by the end of the game.

 

    This same logic applies to the current election. Both parties, and all the American people, knew the rules going into this election. It doesn’t matter who has the most popular votes, what matters is who wins the most electoral college votes, because we are a constitutional republic, not a democracy and for some very good reasons (and here).

 

    If you didn’t vote for Trump, it is OK to be disheartened and worried. I did not vote for him either, and I am very concerned about where four years of Trump may take us. Fight the implementation of his policies, work to change the electoral college if you think we should be closer to a democracy, BUT . . . when you say things like “no, he was not elected by the people, he lost the popular vote so you can’t truthfully say ‘we the people elected him,'” you are just showing everyone that you do not understand the rules of the game. We the people did elect Donald Trump exactly as “we the people” has been understood since 1787.

I wish I had the blind faith of an atheist.

 

SeeNoEvil

e horne and j comeau, asofterworld.com

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Water, water everywhere,

Nor any drop to drink.

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

 

Tornado Outbreaks Could Have a Climate Change Assist, Climate Central, Aug. 5, 2014:

[A] study released Wednesday posits that changes in heat and moisture content in the atmosphere, brought on by a warming world, could be playing a role in making tornado outbreaks more common and severe in the U.S.

Tornadoes, Extreme Weather And Climate Change, Climate Progress, Apr. 28, 2014:

[A] September 2013 study from Stanford, “Robust increases in severe thunderstorm environments in response to greenhouse forcing,” points to “a possible increase in the number of days supportive of tornadic storms.”

Does global warming cause more hurricanes and tornadoes?, ARM.gov (your tax dollars at work):

[A]ccording to those studies, we should expect a greater frequency of very destructive hurricanes and tornados. Because the intense storms are most likely to produce tornados, then we could expect more tornados.

And yet . . . U.S. tornado numbers among lowest in recorded history in 2014 (Washington Post, Dec. 10, 2014)

It’s the great depression for tornado activity in the U.S.

. . .

2014 joins 2012 and 2013 as very inactive years for tornadoes. “When adjusted for report inflation through November, the last three years in a row have fallen well below the mean,” Carbin says.

Oh, and, The Online Tornado FAQ, NOAA Storm Prediction Center (your other tax dollars at work):

Does “global warming” cause tornadoes? No. Thunderstorms do. The harder question may be, “How will climate change influence tornado occurrence?” The best answer is: We don’t know.

Brigitte Gabriel responds to a Muslim woman claiming Muslims are portrayed badly.

“It is the radicals who kill.”  Look at Nazi Germany, Stalinist Russia, Maoist China or Imperial Japan, “The peaceful majority were irrelevant.”

What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca-Cola, and you know that the President drinks Coke, Liz Taylor drinks Coke, and just think, you can drink Coke, too. A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the Cokes are the same and all the Cokes are good. Liz Taylor knows it, the President knows it, the bum knows it, and you know it.

— Andy Warhol, The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (1975)

cocacola_l

(Thanks to Thom for pointing me down the road to this quote.)

Success Breeds HateWhen people are presented with the alternatives of hating themselves for their failure or hating others for their success, they seldom choose to hate themselves.

–Thomas Sowell, Black Rednecks and White Liberals, p. 77 (2005).

Look, we did something.

Look, we did something.

From Charles C. Mann’s fascinating book 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus (p. 235, emphasis added):

Spread at its greatest extent over seven hundred miles of the coastline, Chimor was an ambitious state that grew maize and cotton by irrigating almost fifty thousand acres around the Moche River (all of modern Peru only reached that figure in 1960).  A destructive El Niño episode about 1100 A.D. made irrigation impossible for a while.  In response, the government forced gangs of captive laborers to build a fifty-three-mile, masonry-lined canal to channel water from the Chicama River, in the next valley to the north, to farmland in the Moche Valley.  The canal was a flop: some parts ran uphill, apparently because of incompetent engineering, and the rest lost nine-tenths of its water to evaporation and seepage.  Some archeologists believe that the canal was never meant to function.  It was a PR exercise, they say, a Potemkin demonstration by the Chimor government that it was actively fighting El Niño.

Whenever I hear a politician or government official say: “This may not be an ideal solution, but we must do something about [you name it].” I think of the ancient Peruvians and their up-hill canal — and about ways to hide my wallet.